Social Studies

Teachers and Courses:

Mr. Neal Calcote:
ncalcote@yorkcsd.org
Global History & Geography Grade 10

Mr. Dave Dermody:
dgdermody@yorkcsd.org
7th & 8th Grade Social Studies

Ms. Amy Ivers:
asivers@yorkcsd.org (Department Chair)
Global History & Geography Grade 9, Sociology

Mr. Bill MacKenzie:
wdmackenzie@yorkcsd.org
Participation In Government Grade 12, Economics Grade 12

Ms. Kathy Valentine:
kevalentine@yorkcsd.org
United States History Grade 11

United States History Grades 7 & 8:
Social studies content in grades 7 and 8 focuses on a chronologically organized study of United States and New York State history. Course content is divided into 11 units, tracing the human experience in the United States from pre-Columbian times to the present, and tying political, geographic, economic, and social trends in United States history to parallel trends and time frames in New York State history. Students explore 11 units of study within a two-year time frame.

The grades 7-8 course builds on and seeks to reinforce skills, concepts, and content understandings introduced in the K-6 program. It provides a solid content base in American history, allowing the grade 11 course to do greater justice to the study of the United States as a developing and fully developed industrial nation. By including hemispheric links to Canada and Mexico when appropriate, students develop a model for the global connections they will discover in the grades 9 and 10 social studies program.

Global History & Geography Grades 9 & 10:

The global history and geography curriculum is designed to focus on the five social studies standards, common themes that recur across time and place, and eight historical units. This curriculum provides students with the opportunity to explore what is happening in various regions and civilizations at a given time. In addition, it enables students to investigate issues and themes from multiple perspectives and make global connections and linkages that lead to in-depth understanding. As students explore the five social studies standards, they will have multiple opportunities to explore the content and intellectual skills of history and the social science disciplines.

United States History & Government Grade 11:

This core curriculum lists examples that describe how individuals and groups throughout history have challenged and influenced public policy and constitutional change. These examples and this course of study should help students understand how ordinary citizens and groups of people interacted with lawmakers and policy makers and made a difference.

This core curriculum is organized into seven historical units. The State Regents examination for United States History and Government will be based on the content in this core curriculum. The following concepts and themes in United States history are also emphasized in this curriculum: Change, Citizenship, Civic Values, Constitutional Principles, Culture and Intellectual Life, Diversity, Economic Systems, Environment, Factors of Production, Foreign Policy, Government, Human Systems, Immigration and Migration, Individuals, Groups, Institutions, Interdependence, Physical Systems, Places and Regions, Reform Movements, Presidential Decisions and Actions, Science and Technology.

Participation In Government Grade 12:

This course will:

  • be interdisciplinary, for it will be drawn from areas beyond the defined social studies curriculum; will include life experience beyond classroom and school
  • be related to problems or issues addressed by students, i.e., content in the form of data, facts, or knowledge may vary from school to school, but real and substantive issues at the local, State, national, and global levels will be integrated into the program
  • be in the form of intellectual processes or operations necessary to deal with data generated by problems or issues addressed.

In addition, the term "participation" will be interpreted in the broad sense to include actual community service programs or out-of-school internships, and in-class, in-school activities that involve students in the analysis of public issues chosen because of some unique relevance to the student involved. Defining, analyzing, monitoring, and discussing issues and policies is the fundamental participatory activity in a classroom.

Economics Grade 12:

The study of economics in grade 12 should provide students with the economic knowledge and skills that enable them to function as informed and economically literate citizens in our society and in the world. The course is designed to be used with all students, emphasizes rational decision making, and encourages students to become wiser consumers as well as better citizens.

Sociology 101 - 20 weeks - 1/2 credit (College Advanced Studies)

This is a college level course offered through the Genesee Advanced Studies Program. The following prerequisites must be met:

  • Student must have an 85+ accumulated (Grades 9-11) Social Studies average or Social Studies department recommendation.
  • Student must register at the GCC rate per credit hour in order to be admitted to this course.

This course is a study of the major factors affecting the structure and functioning of group life. Social patterns such as cultural values, deviance, class structure and social change will be explored. Upon completion, each student will understand the methods and perspectives sociologists employ as well as the ways group forces influence the individual in society.

The course will focus upon basic theories and concepts of a variety of sociological areas. Two issue projects; informal oral reports and two inquiry papers will be required. Specific formats for these assignments will be given in class. Chapter tests will be given throughout the semester.

Course objectives are to demonstrate an ability to analyze data, to exhibit a knowledge of the terms and concepts utilized in sociology, to apply concepts discussed in reading to students own life experiences, and to demonstrate a knowledge of various theoretical viewpoints common in sociology.

Each student is billed in a similar fashion to Psychology 101, with successful completion, resulting in 3 college credits that are transferable to any college in the state university system. Regent's credit toward a fifth year may also be available.

Sociology is concerned with the scientific study of the group life of human beings and resulting social behavior. This course encourages the development of critical analysis on the part of the students by the emphasis on concepts rather than a mere accumulation of facts. It is essential that the students understand the complex world in which we live and develop insights into the thoughts and feelings of people whose way of life seems alien to our own.

Psychology 101 - 20 weeks - 1/2 credit (College Advanced Studies):

This is a college level course offered through the Genesee Advanced Studies Program. The following prerequisites must be met:

  • Student must have an 85+ accumulated (Grades 9-11) Social Studies average or Social Studies department recommendation.
  • Student must register at the GCC rate per credit hour in order to be admitted to this course.

Psychology 101 is a basic introduction to the scientific study of human and animal behavior. Topics covered include basic methodology, motivation, cognitive processes, and other significant areas of interest.

Students who select to enroll in this course are billed at a rate of approximately $42 per credit hour through the college. In addition, students have to apply for admission to GCC as part-time student. Successful completion of Psychology 101 results in 3 credit hours that are transferable to any college in the state university system. Regent's credit toward a fifth year may also be available.

Psychology Local - 20 weeks - ½ credit

Psychology is a basic introduction to the scientific study of human and animal behavior. Topics covered include basic methodology, motivation, cognitive processes, and other significant areas of interest.

Local Government Internship (Enrichment)

The purpose of this course is to permit selected students a "hands-on" experience within the framework of their own local government.

Selection: Students who have an average of 85% or higher within the Social Studies department or receive recommendation from the department may interview for the positions available. The interview process will take place in front of the entire department and the High School Guidance Counselor. Each candidate should be prepared to answer a number of questions ranging from current events, historical significance and governmental issues.

Objectives: As a result of this project, students selected will be able to:

  1. Gain an understanding of their local government & community issues
  2. Help gather and interpret information for the Town
  3. Experience the real workings of their own local government

Participate on the Town Community Input board and other boards of their interest enabling them to understand the actual "nuts & bolts" of local government.

Project Requirements:

  1. Students must keep a journal of their daily activity
  2. Students, toward the end of the semester, must be available to give the government classes feedback on their local government via a lecture for one class period
  3. Students must actively participate on the various boards in which they are to serve
  4. Students will be required to sign a log book at the Town Clerk's office accounting for their time spent.

Evaluation: A five-week evaluation of the candidates will occur that coincides with the school's evaluative period. The Town Supervisor, the Town Clerk and the Co-operating teacher will determine the grade on a pass/fail basis.

A.P. European History - 40 weeks - 1 credit

This is a college level course focused on preparation for the Advanced Placement Examination. The following prerequisites must be met:

  • Students must have an 85+ accumulated (Grade 9-11) Social Studies average or Social Studies department recommendation.
  • Students taking A.P. European History who choose to take the A.P. Exam are required to pay the approximately $75 fee for the A.P. Exam in May.

In the Advanced Placement European History course, students acquire knowledge of the basic events and movements that occurred in Europe during the time period from approximately 1450 to the present. These events and movements are explored through three themes: intellectual and cultural history, political and diplomatic history, and social and economic history. In addition, students learn how to analyze historical documents and how to express their historical understanding in writing.

The AP European History course offers motivated students and teachers the opportunity to immerse themselves in the events and ideas that have made our culture what it is today. Despite all the discussions pro and con over the past generation about the canon and multiculturalism, the fact remains that the European tradition continues to be a major influence in the modern world. Without a firm grounding in the strengths and weaknesses of modern Europe, young people cannot function effectively in the worlds of today and tomorrow. Indeed, human rights and material abundance are the twin poles of what the rest of the world seems to want, and both are products of modern Europe.